Thanksgiving Digest (IBM E-Commerce Edition): Mobile 43% Of All Traffic, Over 25% Of All Online Sales

Andy Peatling:

Purchases on touch devices accounted for almost half of online Thanksgiving sales yesterday. The mobile freight train keeps speeding along.

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

For many years, Black Friday — the day after Thanksgiving — marked the start of the holiday shopping rush. But with many (not all) physical stores closed on Thanksgiving, a window of opportunity has emerged for e-commerce sites to push out offers and start selling a day earlier. That has proven to be big business: online sales in the U.S. this Thanksgiving were up nearly 20% (19.7%) on 2012, with an especially strong push from mobile devices, which accounted for over one-quarter (25.8%) of all sales on the day and nearly half of all e-commerce traffic.

The data, from IBM’s Benchmark real-time reporting unit, covers some 800 online retailers and millions of transactions. (Look here for a progress report on how the day developed yesterday, and today IBM is releasing the final, summary figures.)

IBM doesn’t provide sales in gross dollar amounts — just in terms of growth…

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iPhone 5s teardown might explain accelerometer issues

Andy Peatling:

Sounds like this is fixable in a future software update.

Originally posted on Gigaom:

A few weeks ago Gizmodo put the iPhone 5s(s aapl) through some simple tests to show that its motion sensor calibration was significantly off. Now RealityCap CEO Eagle Jones is reporting that this is due to the use of a new accelerometer, as revealed by a teardown of the phone in Chipworks.

Jones indicates that the iPhone 5s uses a Bosch Sensortech accelerometer, as opposed to the STMicroelectronics accelerometer used in previous iPhones. According to Jones, both parts deliver similar consistency in measurement, but a difference in the “zero-g offset” could be at the root of the miscalibration issue. Jones writes:

The second key spec for accelerometers is the zero-g offset, or bias. This indicates the range for a roughly constant offset that will be added to every output sample of data due to manufacturing variance. This can also change over time due to mechanical stress or temperature…

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